On Friday, April 7, the parent and guardian association of the Beatrice State Developmental Center (BSDC) and I hosted a tour of the facilities for some of my fellow senators and their staff.

Sen. Merv Riepe, current chairman of the Legislature’s Health and Human Services committee, Sen. Steve Erdman of Bayard, and Sen. Steve Halloran of Hastings attended, as well as Kate Gotsdinger and Evan Schmeits from Sen. McDonnell’s office (Omaha) and Oliver VanDervoort from Sen. Blood’s office (Bellevue). Developmental Disabilities Director Courtney Miller was also on hand to field questions.

About 24 people were present. This was the first time the other senators had been to BSDC. The parents and guardians always do an excellent job of showing the facilities at BSDC as well as advocating for their loved ones.

The range of topics discussed in the Unicameral is as varied as the people of our wonderful state.

On Wednesday, April 5, the senators debated and advanced LB 300 introduced by Senator Bob Krist of Omaha, which eliminates the statute of limitations for civil action brought against a perpetrator of sexual assault of a child. The original version of the bill allowed a person who was a victim of sexual abuse as a child to bring a civil suit within 12 years following the victim’s 21st birthday.

An amendment adopted during debate would apply the bill retroactively and allows a victim to file a civil suit within 35 years of his or her 18th birthday or within three years of the bill’s operative date, whichever is longer. Senators who spoke on Wednesday talked about the years of therapy sometimes required. This bill would allow a victim to bring a suit when they are emotionally ready to take on this action.

There were concerns raised about the constitutionality of applying the retroactive clause to cases that have already been considered closed. Senator Bob Krist offered an amendment that would add a severability clause which means if any portion of a bill is declared unconstitutional, the remaining portions of the bill would still be valid. The bill advanced 29-3.

A bill important to Beatrice and communities with riverfront land would create a new economic development tool to use. Bellevue Senator Sue Crawford introduced LB 97.

The bill gives municipalities the ability to create, by the adoption of an ordinance, a Riverfront Development District and a Riverfront Development Authority to oversee and manage the district. Municipalities can use this tool to effectively fund, manage, and promote strategic municipal economic development and tourism efforts on riverfronts across the state.

A city could fix and charge rents and fees; install pedestrian shopping malls, plazas or other facilities; construct boardwalks, barges, docks and wharves; develop, manage, and coordinate public activities and events within the district, to name a few.

In LB 97, a city would be required to set a cap on the bonding, and an occupation tax or special assessment tax could not be imposed on the same property if the boundaries overlap. Due to the fiscal note, the vote was “on principle” with the understanding that the bill will not likely reach final approval this year. At this point, the bill has advanced to the second round of debate on a 39-0 vote.

Released last week but not yet debated was the highly anticipated revenue tax package LB 461.

This bill has taken weeks and weeks of discussion by the Revenue Committee members, and is sure to bring diverse opinions on which tax cuts are appropriate: property tax or income tax, rural or urban. The bill would phase in cuts to the top personal and corporate income tax rates; agricultural land would change from market value to income capacity, annual aggregate growth of ag land values would be capped and these values must fall between 55 percent and 65 percent of market value.

The Governor believes that an income tax cut for the top income earners is essential in order to succeed in getting property tax reductions passed. Some senators believe property tax relief is the primary goal. The debate on this bill will be intense and heated.

If anyone would like to read the proposed amendment to LB 461, which becomes the bill, information can be accessed on nebraskalegislature.gov. I will address LB 461in more detail once the bill is debated.

Contact Sen. Roy Baker's office at 402-471-2620 or by email at rbaker@leg.ne.gov

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