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Many parts of Nebraska have faced flooding issues recently that have done a great deal of damage to homes and properties. Flooding has also caused damage to our landscapes and garden spaces.

 Trees in the floods

Floods can do a lot of damage to our trees, depending on the length of time the trees were under water. According to the University of Wisconsin Extension, most plants can tolerate a few days of flooding during the growing season. Now that flood waters have or are receding take time to look at your tree and assess the damage.

When assessing the damage to your tree, make sure the roots remain at the same level in the soil and remove debris from around the tree roots. Hire an arborist to remove broken branches and check the stability of any leaning tree. If the tree is now leaning toward a building or other damaging location, have the tree removed. Do not fertilize your trees for at least a year to avoid further damage or disruption to re-establishing roots.

Garden space in the floods

Vegetable Gardens would be a concern due to food safety reasons. Floodwaters are not clean and they can carry bacteria and other harmful debris and pollutants with them as they move across the land. Fortunately, the floods came through before our gardens were planted, but there is still a concern with the soils and what crops we will plant. Spring garden crops and crops with edible parts coming into contact with previously flooded soils would be the most concerning.

According to John Porter, Urban Ag Program Coordinator for Nebraska Extension:

The recommendation depends on whether or not the crop comes in contact with the soil. For crops that do not have direct contact with the soil, such as tomatoes, peppers, beans, etc. the waiting period between flooding and harvest should be at least 90 days. For crops that do have direct contact with the soil, such as lettuce and leafy greens, squash/pumpkins, and root crops such as potatoes and carrots the waiting period should be at least 120 days. If the crops that don’t typically make contact with the soil are allowed to make contact, like tomatoes that aren’t staked, the 120 day recommendation should be followed.

Food safety concerns wouldn’t be present to gardens that were not affected by the floods. We can still plant our gardens into the soil during the 90 or 120 day waiting period, but any mature harvest should be discarded until after that waiting period for food safety. This means that we should opt out of spring gardening in areas where the floods impacted our vegetable garden spaces. Most of our summer crops would be fine, but you may want to use a trellis for cucumbers and use container gardening for things like zucchini to be on the safe side.

Turf in the floods

Lawns are very resilient in flooded areas. It is best to stay off of wet lawns to avoid compacting the soil. Wait until it has dried out before mowing, driving equipment over, walking excessively over, and cleaning up the debris that may be on the lawn. Turfgrass can survive 4-6 days submerged, according to Missouri Extension. Most of our localized flooding receded quickly, so the lawn should survive. In areas that are still under water, when the floods do recede soil work, clean-up, and overseeding will be necessary. We may also see an increase in lawn diseases this summer due to the high amounts of rain and floodwater that affected them this spring.

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If you have any further questions please contact Nicole Stoner at (402) 223-1384, nstoner2@unl.edu, visit the Gage County Extension website at www.gage.unl.edu, or like my facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/NicoleStonerHorticulture and follow me on twitter @Nikki_Stoner

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