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Two clashing climatic behemoths, one natural and one with human fingerprints, will square off this summer to determine how quiet or chaotic the Atlantic hurricane season will be. An El Nino is brewing and the natural weather event which warps weather worldwide dramatically dampens hurricane activity.  But at the same time record ocean heat is bubbling up in the Atlantic, partly stoked by human-caused climate change, and it provides boosts of fuel for storms.  This scenario hasn’t happened before. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, like most forecasters, are calling for a near normal season.

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Here are the bestsellers for the week that ended Saturday, May 20, compiled from data from independent and chain bookstores, book wholesalers and independent distributors nationwide, powered by Circana BookScan © 2023 Circana. (Reprinted from Publishers Weekly, published by PWxyz LLC. © 2023, PWxyz LLC.) HARDCOVER FICTION 1. "Happy Place" by Emily Henry (Berkley) Last week: 1 2. "Only the ...

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Many residents of Guam remain without power and utilities after Typhoon Mawar tore through the remote U.S. Pacific territory and ripped roofs off homes, flipped vehicles and shredded trees. There no immediate reports of deaths or injuries. The typhoon is the strongest to hit the territory of roughly 150,000 people since 2002. It briefly made landfall Wednesday night as a Category 4 storm. The island’s international airport flooded and the swirling typhoon churned up a storm surge and waves that crashed through coastal reefs and flooded homes. An island meteorologist said Thursday that “what used to be a jungle looks like toothpicks.”

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Guam residents facing down the strongest typhoon to hit their remote U.S. Pacific island territory in decades had identical twin meteorologists helping them get ready and stay safe this week. The National Weather Service’s Guam office employs Landon Aydlett as its warning coordination meteorologist. His brother Brandon Aydlett is the science and operations officer. The 41-year-olds tag-teamed Facebook live broadcasts watched by thousands as Typhoon Mawar approached. Landon Aydlett said Thursday morning that working with his brother is like working with his best friend. He says they never planned to work together but the jobs fell in their laps and they followed their heart and passion for the work.

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A tornado swept through Hallam on May 22, 2004, leveling most homes and businesses. Volunteers in surrounding communities including Lincoln ca…

Extreme drought completely disappeared from much of southwest and north-central Nebraska, which were areas that received several inches of rain last week. But extreme drought expanded in Lancaster County.

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Rescue crews are working to reach towns and villages in northern Italy that were cut off from highways, electricity and cell phone service following heavy rains and flooding. Farmers are warning of “incalculable” losses and authorities have begun mapping out cleanup and reconstruction plans. The death toll from rains that pushed two dozen rivers and tributaries to burst their banks stood at nine, with some people still unaccounted-for. The drought-parched region of Emilia-Romagna had already estimated some 1 billion euros in losses from heavy rains earlier this month. But officials said the losses now reached multiple billions given the widespread damage to farmland, storefronts and infrastructure from this week’s flooding.

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A new study says climate change’s hotter temperatures and society’s diversion of water have been shrinking the world’s lakes by trillions of gallons of water a year since the early 1990s. In the study published Thursday, scientists looked at nearly 2,000 of the world’s largest lakes. They found that from 1992 to 2020, the world lost the equivalent of 17 Lake Meads, America’s largest reservoir. Even lakes in areas getting more rainfall are shrinking. That's because a thirstier atmosphere from warmer air sucking up more water in evaporation, and a thirsty society that is diverting water from lakes to agriculture, power plants and drinking supplies.

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